Posted tagged ‘soup’

Pea Soup

August 8, 2011

I should have picked my peas two days ago.  A few of them were beyond prime.  However, I found  a recipe that included a pinch of sugar to compensate and the peas were fresh from my garden.  The mint was from my herb pots.  I used a vidalia onion, vegetable broth, water, and butter.  The proportions aren’t written in stone.   I simmered the ingredients  for thirty minutes, then added some milk and cream, and seasoned the soup with black pepper.  It was quite good.  So far  this year I’ve had beet greens, swiss chard, cress, string beans, and peas from my garden, and I’ve made liberal use of herbs and flowers for garnish.

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Tanzanian soup

September 26, 2009

tansoupingrThis is my version of a recipe for Tanzanian soup that was in circulation a few Lents ago in Lutheran churches.  In this area, Lenten services, at least the ones I know about, tend to focus on issues of social justice, world hunger, etc.  One year there were suggested recipes for each of the weeks of Lent, featuring various world cultures.  The idea was to have a soup and sandwich supper and to encourage self examination along with a church service.  The ingredients are rice, beans, fresh tomatoes, onion, garlic, coconut milk, bell pepper, and curry powder (about a half teaspoon).  It is very good and tastes good on a cool fall evening as well as early spring.

fruit soup

January 22, 2009

Norwegian fruktsuppe, or sotsuppe, joined rommegrot (cream mush) as a food carried to new mothers by the women of the community. The custom known as sengemat (bed food) dates back to the Viking age and was continued well into the twentieth century among immigrants in the New World.

To make sweet soup, add the following ingredients to a double boiler: one and one half quarts water, a small can of grape juice, one cup mixed dried fruit, one cup prunes, one half cup raisins, one sliced lemon, two sliced oranges, two chopped apples, a half cup sugar, two tablespoons sago or pearl sized tapioca, and a stick of cinnamon. Cook covered until the sago is clear, adding more water as necessary.

Citrus fruits may have been scarce in nineteenth century Norway but this recipe has evolved to reflect the changing realities. You may add almost any kind of fruit or berry that you have available, including apricots, cherries, pears, and so on. If the fruits are sweet, you may need to cut down on the sugar or eliminate it altogether. Be sure to remove the cinnamon stick before serving.

Fruit soup is traditionally eaten cold but it’s also good warm, garnished with an orange slice or topped with a dollop of cream or ice cream.

My recent attempt at sweet soup didnt taste very good. Don’t make these mistakes! I added cranberries to the mix, which were pretty and pretty sour. And oh by the way… I didnt use real frozen grape juice.

Norwegian fruktsuppe

Norwegian fruktsuppe