Posted tagged ‘cooking’

Warmer Days

January 22, 2013

5433994329_cbae7ac14b_bI neglect this cooking blog horribly. More so than my other blogs. On this cold winter day I am reminded of warmer days. Happier days. I remember my mother and Hilda, a friend who lived to be 100, cooking rømmegrøt in the kitchen. Hilda also made rømmebrød, which looked like pie crust but tasted heavenly. She also made julekage. My mother didn’t make as many of the traditional Norwegian dishes but she did make some nameless Swedish puddings that she had learned from her grandmother. Also she had a fondness for limpa (Swedish rye bread), and she made jelly roll and oatmeal bars out of Saskatoon blueberries. When we held a hospice festival here on the farm, I set up a little Scandinavian bakery in the summer kitchen. We were going to sell treats like krumkake, lefse, the above-mentioned rømmebrød, and an aunt who isn’t even Scandinavian made a delicious Swedish flatbread with anise that she had researched. The neighbor who was a star attraction with her lefse refused to sit in the summer kitchen (not enough air in there). I had to set her up under a canopy outdoors so that knocked my Scandinavian bakery idea in the head. I also remember Hilda told me she had never made waffles. So I loaned her my waffle maker. She had me over for her waffles, which were kind of heavy, and confessed it wasn’t really her thing, and if I wanted the waffle maker back, I knew where it was. I never did go get it. I’m sure it’s still in her house. Waffle making isn’t my specialty either.

A Humble Servant named Ole

June 13, 2009

<ins Guarding the Garden
He is guarding corn, string beans, beets, salad greens, flowers, tomatoes, cabbage, swiss chard, zucchini, tomatoes…….

fruit soup

January 22, 2009

Norwegian fruktsuppe, or sotsuppe, joined rommegrot (cream mush) as a food carried to new mothers by the women of the community. The custom known as sengemat (bed food) dates back to the Viking age and was continued well into the twentieth century among immigrants in the New World.

To make sweet soup, add the following ingredients to a double boiler: one and one half quarts water, a small can of grape juice, one cup mixed dried fruit, one cup prunes, one half cup raisins, one sliced lemon, two sliced oranges, two chopped apples, a half cup sugar, two tablespoons sago or pearl sized tapioca, and a stick of cinnamon. Cook covered until the sago is clear, adding more water as necessary.

Citrus fruits may have been scarce in nineteenth century Norway but this recipe has evolved to reflect the changing realities. You may add almost any kind of fruit or berry that you have available, including apricots, cherries, pears, and so on. If the fruits are sweet, you may need to cut down on the sugar or eliminate it altogether. Be sure to remove the cinnamon stick before serving.

Fruit soup is traditionally eaten cold but it’s also good warm, garnished with an orange slice or topped with a dollop of cream or ice cream.

My recent attempt at sweet soup didnt taste very good. Don’t make these mistakes! I added cranberries to the mix, which were pretty and pretty sour. And oh by the way… I didnt use real frozen grape juice.

Norwegian fruktsuppe

Norwegian fruktsuppe

Let’s make something hot.

August 21, 2008

sweet stuff

August 21, 2008

There is something sensual about food.  Late summer and early fall brings the apples, plums, berries, and garden vegetables.  We were meant to look long, breathe deep, taste and smell the harvest.